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Latest update on Typhoon Maysak

Latest update on Typhoon Maysak

02:39 PM

Typhoon Maysak is located 570 km east of Manila and is likely to make landfall on Sunday. Typhoon Maysak has attained the status of Category 1 storm in the Pacific Ocean. Maysak will maintain its status of a tropical storm at the time of landfall and will then enter South China Sea as a weak system.

Updated on April 3, 2015: Typhoon Maysak is no longer a super Typhoon as it continues to weaken in the Pacific Ocean. Currently, it is marked as a category 2 storm with a sustained wind speed of 150 km/hr gusting to 180 km/hr. At the moment, it is about 900 km east of Manila. The Typhoon will be moving westnorthwestwards and is projected to make a landfall in the northern parts of Philippines on Sunday as a tropical storm. The strong winds and rainfall may dampen the spirits of Easter for the catholic nation.

Updated on April 2, 2015: From the super typhoon status, Maysak has now weakened while continuing its journey towards Philippines. Though the expected landfall of the typhoon is slated for the weekend, flooding and heavy rain in the next 24 hours cannot be ruled out.  After leaving a trail of destruction in Yap, one of the several Micronesian islands, Maysak aims to interrupt the Easter celebration predominantly Catholic nation, Philippines. It is the first March supertyphoon in last 12 years.

 

Updated on April 1, 2015: After growing into a super typhoon earlier this week and causing widespread destruction in Micronesia, Maysak continues to make its way to the Philippines. Though it is expected to weaken on its way, residents of Philippines have been asked to be prepared for the worst. The Super Typhoon Maysak is expected to enter Philippines by the weekend. Maysak is the 3rd most intense super typhoon ever observed in the Northwestern Pacific in January – March period. Currently, the winds are at 250 kmph, but with gusts around 330-340kmph. The increased wind shear on the way may influence typhoon Maysak and weaken it.

Updated on March 31, 2015: Typhoon Maysak has now intensified to become a strong Category 4 hurricane, as per the National Weather Service in Guam. The typhoon is expected to strengthen further and may become a super typhoon in the next 36 hours or so with winds of 150 kmph. It will continue to affect parts of Micronesia in next 24 hours or so. The typhoon can possibly cause havoc in Philippines over the weekend. The typhoon’s eye was spotted east of Yap and well south-southwest of Guam on Tuesday morning. Warnings have been issued for parts of Yap state as Maysak’s centre is expected to pass close to populated islands of Yap on Tuesday night.

 

Updated on March 30, 2015: As the month of March comes to an end, yet another typhoon threat emerges in west Pacific Ocean. Typhoon Maysak has formed in the Pacific Ocean and is now strengthening to a strong Typhoon status. Maysak in  Cambodian means a kind of tree. The typhoon started as a tropical storm & first impacted the state of Chuuk on Friday close to Micronesia, to the southeast of Guam. Since then the tropical storm has been gaining strength and has become a typhoon. It will further gain strength and become a very powerful typhoon during the next few days. The populated island of Yap is in danger as Typhoon Maysak will either have a close encounter or even make a landfall in Yap, a group of four of islands. This can happen anytime from Tuesday afternoon to Tuesday night, local time. During this time typhoon Maysak will be close to its peak intensity with sustained winds of 190 kmph or more, gusting to a high of 240 kmph which is equivalent to a category 3 hurricane. Major damage due to high winds and flooding rain is expected across Yap Islands. After crossing Yap islands, the typhoon will be influenced by rising wind shear as it moves across the western Philippines Sea. This wind shear will tend to weaken the typhoon as it approaches Philippines later this week. Although, typhoon Maysak will be weakening during the end of the week, it would still be a typhoon when it starts to affect eastern Philippines during the weekend. The typhoon’s likely path will be through central and northern Philippines, which may bring damaging winds and flooding rain in the region.