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Czech Republic records 2018 as its 'hottest year' in history

Czech Republic records 2018 as its 'hottest year' in history

10:09 AM

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Europe is home to one of the coldest places on Earth, all credit goes to its geographical location. However, since the beginning of the century, there has come an alteration to the trends. European countries are observing abruptly hot temperatures.

Czech Republic is a European country located in Central Europe- known for its historic castles, effervescent beers and a rich history. Czech Republic lies mostly between latitudes 48° and 51° N, and longitudes 12° and 19° E.

In 2018, Czech Republic recorded its hottest year since the beginning of records in 1775, which means, a total of 244 years as per the data shared by Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (CHMI). "In 2018, the average annual temperature in Prague-Clementium was 12.8°C, or 3.2° more compared to the average between 1775-2014," said one statement by CHMI. The previous record annual average temperature in Prague, 12.5°C, was set in 2014 and 2015.

The institute described this year's temperature as being "extraordinarily above normal".

Although, every month of the year was not topping the ‘hottest list’ in 2018 e.g. August was the third hottest month after 1807 and 2014. It was the overall year and the outcome that was the hottest.

And not just the year turned out to be the hot one for Czech, figures tell that the ten hottest years in history were recorded in this century alone.

Also, back in Summers, the capital city of Prague had recorded the hottest season this year when Czech Hydro-meteorological Institute (CHMI) had reported 32.7°C on July 31.

And not just Czech Republic, many other European countries were recorded going through same. Baltic countries (European counties sharing coastline with Baltic Sea) experienced hot spells and almost drought-like conditions. Northern European countries which are one of the coldest countries in the world, such as Sweden, Norway, Denmark experienced the same last year. Scientists are attributing this to global warming which is causing the round-the-Earth climate change.

In the Frame- Prague City

Image Credits – variety.com 

Any information taken from here should be credited to Skymet Weather